Thursday, September 12, 2013

English is Literally Dying, Supposably

Bastardization of the English language is everywhere, and no, that's not just another cheap shot at Fifty Shades of Grey. We're talking about commonplace words that people misuse in everyday conversation and have mangled for years, making for verbal STDs that just won't seem to ever go away.

Example:


Did you catch both of those? If you didn't, grab a pen and paper and your best Thinking Cap. This post is especially for you.

Sure, we know what the guy above is getting at. "Supposedly" there will be a "nuclear" war. But when someone uses words like those, all I really hear is this...


Remember, folks, there's no supposedly about it - "supposably" is not a word. And "nuclear" is pronounced just as it appears - noo-klee-er.

Another gem is when someone can't properly pronounce the word "library."



All I really hear is this, of course.


Because nothing makes one look illiterate quite like the mispronunciation of the place to find books. Remember - there are two Rs in library, so use 'em both.



irregardless aks

Two more great offenses right there. Sorry, but "irregardless" is not a word. The correct term is "regardless." A word like "irregardless" is a double negative and therefore cancels itself out. As for the word "aks", well, that's not a word either. It's "ask."



That's because you probably are. If you talk about something "literally", it means exactly what you're implying in the simplest of senses. Example: you bump shoulders with a friend's sister and then say, "Dude, I literally ran into your sister today." That means that you're taking a figurative expression - ran into her - and saying that you ran into her physically, too.

But when you say something like "I was so angry that my head literally exploded"... that's not possible. Not unless this happened.


my head literally exploded

And unfortunately, Merriam-Webster isn't helping our case. In August, they officially changed the dictionary definition of "literally" to mean its exact opposite - just to overemphasize something figuratively.



But irregardless, if people keep supposably butchering these words, then some day, at your local lie-berry, you may literally see the dictionary changed into a noo-kyuh-ler holocaust of bastardized words. But don't aks us to explain why they do this. We just write the words; we don't make them up.

What misused words really grind your gears?

Cheers and stay literate, friends,
-B&B

Music: Terraplane Sun
Beer: Ska Estival Cream Stout

Ask Body Spray

112 comments:

  1. Oh how I love this post!!!! Here in the south, the words that come out of people's mouths literally shock me. My favorite is when a redneck wishes someone a Happy Birfday!

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    1. Sometimes when talking to rednecks I feel like I need a translation guide.

      "Oh, he said my 'britches' are 'fixin to' fall off. According to page 27, he means that 'my pants are in danger of falling down.' Thank you for your concern for my attire, sir."

      Delete
  2. You've been visiting the South, haven't you?
    I could list a lot, but I'll go with slam (We were slam busy today) and ya'll.

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    1. Along with y'all, don't forget you'uns. Wait, who'uns?

      Delete
  3. Eh, I used to be angry at crimes against grammar, but it's an unwinnable war. If people literally don't know how to use literally, are you going to sit them down and change their ways? Probably not, they're dumb because they am no liking learning. Language is fluid, it will continue to evolve for better or worse, just sit back and ride the wave. I hate "text speak" and want to assault people who say LOL out loud in conversation (yes, it happens), but my parents probably hated my excessive use of "dude".

    ReplyDelete
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    1. As long as language doesn't devolve to the point that I have to write novels in text speak (see below comment) I'll continue to ride the wave. But that doesn't mean I'll be doing it with a smile on my face.

      Delete
  4. Around here they say aks. Can I aks you something? I think text language is really wreaking havoc with language as well. A limited language results in limiting the complexity of thought one is capable of.

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    1. I fear the day books are written in text speak.

      "It wz a drk and scry nite. Tom wz nt feeln so gr8."

      Delete
    2. I have read several books of old letters. They were beautifully written. They were poetic and intelligent. Do you think that twenty-five years from now someone will publish a book on someone's text messages?

      Delete
  5. Even though I'm the anti-thesis of what a southerner is portrayed to be, I do say nuclear like an idiot.

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    1. If that's your only offense, it sounds like noo-kyuh-ler is the least of your worries.

      Delete
    2. I'd only be worried if the person with their finger on the button couldn't pronounce it well.

      Delete
  6. Whut y'all talkin bout? I duuno nuthin bout no English, I speak 'merican.

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  7. So apparently supposably is a real word. Shame, now we can't use that as an argument to tell people not to say use it incorrectly. You got me a bit confused for a second on the pronunciation of nuclear there, but thank God, I've been doing it right. No need to feel ashamed of myself now.
    It's terrible people are butchering up the English language like this though. And it's not just that, other languages are suffering as well! I daily encounter people with a less than decent understanding of the Dutch language. Laughable at first, but it quickly gets annoying, maddening even.

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    1. Locals or foreigners, though?

      I think it's fair to say I have a less than decent understanding of the Dutch language. That current level of aptitude being zero.

      Delete
  8. The fact ironic usage of "literally" is now proper English literally grinds my gears.

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    1. And don't forget the wonderful phrase "that's ironic," which now just means anything that's even remotely funny.

      Delete
  9. Uggg that just hurt the head. Thankfully many around here know how to speak properly. But then you get some loons who think Crawded Retruant is proper.

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    1. Those same loons live in our home town, and they love to watch the local ath-a-letes.

      Delete
  10. Hahaha. Can I lol? I had been laughing all morning. Yeah, evil laugh because I am one of the abusers :) I had been thinking about closing and deleting my blog, now with the shout out to my blog, I can't, I just can't let grammar nazis win.
    If twitter is their concentration camp my blog had been the killing field.
    Trust me, usually in Dr office they ask me whether I speak English, I usually reply "I speak Indian English" and when they ask me what do I do, I reply "I work in IT" they immediately ask "so you are the tech support and I speak to you when my computer doesn't work".(irony?)
    I had been contemplating on taking print out of my posts to explain "Indian English".

    If "grinding your ears" is to hearing what is is for reading? I know it isn't "eating my brain" that is Indian English. Again LOL.

    Thanks for the shout out,literally the appropriate post.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Actually it's grinding your gears, like when you drive a manual transmission car and you shift wrong so it grinds the gears. No ear grinding. Though most of these do grind my ears, too.

      The shout out wasn't a nod to your Indian English but just because I thought it would be nice to give you a mention. Also to force you to start blogging again. Did it work?

      Trust me, your Indian English is better than some of the English I see from native speakers, especially text speak. When I read something like, "I h8 2 c u maD r U OK lol jk" I feel like I'm decrypting some kind of secret code.

      Delete
    2. Aren't you too sweet. Thanks Bryan.
      grinding gears not ears? Well, it should be grinding ears. How many English speaking people are driving cars with manual gear and clutch. It is like saying "call me" and doing that rotary dial gesture instead of phone gesture.

      about blogging, since you put it that way I may need to put a post about this Syria thing and make you regret.

      And if anyone is trying to reach me to fix your computer, FYI I don't work in tech support I can't fix computers, I just write code and programs that breaks computers.

      Delete
    3. Hey, I drive THREE cars with a manual transmission. I actually prefer it. I guess I'm retarded like that.

      How about you write a code that posts blog entries? If anyone can make a post about Syria gut-splittingly hilarious, you can...

      Delete
    4. The comments in this particular post are off the hook :)

      You prefer manual transmission? "Mustang Sirey, shift your mustang gear up"?
      I drove Indian cars for a decade - manual gear
      (Insert Luke Skywalker Noooooooooooo) I could blame Indian roads though, getting to 4 is a huge deal forget top gear. Unpossible.

      Scripts to post blog entries? Like the mails that are sent around midnight with managers in CC to imply that we are working too hard? I am too mummified(?!) to try all those tricks now :)
      [Hope Merriam Webster includes mummified in the dictionary like literally, literally]

      Syria - I can only say that some are saying "Let them eat cake" ;-)


      Delete
  11. The misuse and abuse of the English language seriously pisses me off. I'm okay with the definition of words changing, that thing happens all the time, but people need to learn what words are real words and how to pronounce them. Especially in the case of literally. There are words you can change the meaning of. A lot of words these days are now slang or cuss words when they weren't before, bitch and bastard especially. I don't care what the dictionary says, I know what the word "literally" means. I'm vomiting with rage right now. Not literally of course. BECAUSE I KNOW WHAT THE WORD MEANS.

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    1. If you could teach the rest of the 7 billion people on this planet what that means, that would save us a lot of rage vomiting as well. Even the ones who don't speak English. It's just good to know in general.

      Delete
  12. The misuse of "imply" and "infer" can get my knickers in a twist.

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    1. "Imply" and "Infer" is the one that really grinds Nappy's (my Brother's) gears! He bitches 'n' moans about that all the time.

      Good call. (And good answer!)

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loyal American Underground'

      Delete
    2. I meant to write: Good call. (And good RESPONSE!)

      Ooh, that grinds me gears!

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loy--- Oh, hell, you know...

      Delete
  13. I could "of" ....used proper grammar, but then I wouldn't "of" answered the question you axed. AnywayS.
    Can we stop pluralizing anyway? ODDviously not.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. One day we're suppose to move towardS better grammar, but for all intensive purposes, things just aren't like they use to be.

      Delete
  14. The fact that people are further adopting these abominations is literally shocking to me. No, I mean, I actually get electrocuted every time I hear someone say "supposably". It's a rare condition.

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    1. That is literally the worst thing I've ever heard. No, really, it is. I haven't learned about the Holocaust or true human suffering yet.

      Delete
  15. When did "literally" become a trendy word?? I don't get it.

    Personally, I go mental when people say "I could care less" instead of "I COULDN'T care less."

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I literally could care less about this comment.

      ;)

      Delete
  16. This post literally made me think of the character, Chris Traeger, from Parks and Rec and how literally amazing he is!

    "Your inbox is literally full of penises."

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9GVKxSiQVM

    This was one of your best posts because it is frighteningly true. Thanks to things like urban dictionary it's only going to get worse.

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    1. While Chris Traeger is literally a great character, he also is literally one of the reasons that literally was changed in the dictionary. Literally.

      Delete
  17. I don't like people who speak. Ban all forms of communication! Including this comm...

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  18. Especially does NOT have an X in it. It is not EX-Specially! I even heard this on the radio the other day for a local vendor. It just makes me want to avoid their store!

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Or what about expresso? "Yeah, I want a cup of expresso, please. And make it ex-specially strong."

      Delete
  19. "I COULD CARE LESS!"

    That's the one! That's the incorrectly worded expression that literally makes my head explode. And 97% of EVERYONE (including supposedly very educated individuals) be sayin' it wrong, in print, on film, on video, and in mouth.

    I axe you, why they be sayin' it wrong, and giving their true meaning the exact opposite meaning of what they mean?

    ~ D-FensDogg
    'Loyal American Underground'

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    1. It's just amazing that the educated folks who misuse it don't know WHY it's wrong.

      I couldn't care less = I could not possibly be capable of caring less than I do right now.

      I could care less = I am capable of caring less than I do now.

      Seems easy enough, right?

      Delete
    2. I now see that Mich actually beat me to that one. (I didn't have time to read the prior comments before posting mine this morning.)

      But, YES, that's the thing that drives me so crazy about that broken phrase. It's not just that it's incorrect. It's that the incorrect way it is expressed a good 97% of the time LITERALLY(!) gives the phrase a 180-degree OPPOSITE meaning of what the person really means to convey!

      To me that is the worst. It's one thing to be wrong, but to be wrong as wrong as wrong can be wrong is just... WRONG!

      ~ D-FensDogg
      (and all that Jazz)

      Delete
  20. I've read that using literally as figuratively is actually something we've been doing for a long time, though we like to attribute it to the valley girl speak of the 90s. Not sure if that's true.

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    1. Some historians say that the valley girl epidemic of the 1990s was the very beginning of the downfall of English.

      Delete
  21. I'm sure there are a lot... one of my favourites:
    Intensive purposes = Intents & purposes

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  22. My pet peeves? How much time do you have?

    Then/Than
    Your/You're
    Further/Farther
    Their/There/They're

    So. Many. I think my head will literally ex-- *BOOM*

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    1. Psssh. Their's nothing farther from the truth then thinking that your going to literally explode.

      Delete
    2. Okay, I know you're just joking around here, but that whole sentence had me grinding my teeth and wanting to punch you in the face. Literally.

      Delete
    3. I am a little confused. What's your beef with further and farther? When speaking about distance they are synonyms. It is only when we want to mean additional that further should be used.

      Delete
    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  23. How do you feel about Flickr, tumblr, lyft, fiverr, imgur, 500px, hipstamatic, Scribd, unpakt...

    You get my drift. Language is either living or dead, you may have to find yourself learning to deal with some issues along the way. In short this was a get off my lawn post, I think you've officially become old men. The best authors by and large knew the rules of written and spoken language very well, and knew even better when to break the rules.

    Now this isn't to say that I'm not extremely disappointed in the average persons ability to express themselves and the exceptionally limited vocabulary of the majority of our nation. I just don't think it's unique to our generation, or out time. Every generation has been filled with idiots and poorly educated twits, the real trouble is we don't have anything for them to do any longer. Every part of our society requires some sophistication, and those not able to cope are left behind to be carried by social safety nets. And to breed at an alarming rate... So extrapolate that one out.

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    1. Today's post - as is all of our posts - was made in pure fun and has no anger behind it. Once you stop taking our posts so damn literally (look at me, inserting contextual words that relate to the post) and realize we're just clowning around, the more fun you shall have here.

      ...you may have to find yourself learning to deal with some issues along the way

      Then can you point me in the direction of a good word therapist? I FEAR CHANGE.

      The best authors by and large knew the rules of written and spoken language very well, and knew even better when to break the rules.

      I thought this was common knowledge, but since you're sharing this "nugget of wisdom" that must be under the assumption that we're shitty authors. Hey, we can't all be James Pattersons!

      Oh, and those kids can come hang out on my lawn any time they want. It's a party up in this bitch.

      How do you feel about Flickr, tumblr, lyft, fiverr, imgur, 500px, hipstamatic, Scribd, unpakt...

      I think Lyft is a great place to catch a ride with a serial killer if you're willing to suck his dick first. I think Scribd is the perfect place to store my 2,000 page manifesto on the folly of mankind. And I think Hipstamatic is an awesome way to take crystal clear camera technology and create a picture that looks like it was shot with a potato.

      That was what you were asking, right?

      Delete
  24. "Y'all" is a perfectly legitimate use of a plural for "you" other than "you," which is confusing. It is becoming the accepted plural form. "Ya'll" (as Alex said) is not anything. Not that you can tell when someone says it.

    My wife hates "newk-you-ler." I was teasing her about it a couple of weeks ago and stopped, saying, "If I don't stop, I'm going to say this incorrectly on accident." A couple of days later, I did. It made my head explode.
    I hate that they have legitimized that bastard word.

    One of my big peeves is the incorrect usage of the word "done." I tell my kids that if they're "done" then we're ready to eat them.

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    1. >>... My wife hates "newk-you-ler." I was teasing her about it a couple of weeks ago and stopped, saying, "If I don't stop, I'm going to say this incorrectly on accident." A couple of days later, I did.

      I can fully understand that.

      I'm a big fan of the 'black & white' episodes of 'The Andy Griffith Show'. There's one episode where Floyd's barber shop is infiltrated by some bookies. In that episode, Barney Fife explains the reason for the fact that a man who supposably got a haircut the day before, has returned to the barber shop the following day.

      In truth, of course, the man was placing bets with the "bookie barber", but Barney Fife explained the man's return as a "compelsion". He said the man apparently had a hair-cutting compelsion the way some people have "a hand-washing compelsion".

      Well, I joked about the way Barney got the word wrong for so many years that eventually I got myself bamboozled 'bout it. Now, every time I go to say the word "compulsion", there's a slight pause while my mind goes searching through the files to remind myself whether I'm supposed to say "compulsion" or "compelsion".

      I hate what Barney Fife did to me!

      ~ D-FensDogg
      'Loyal American Underground'

      Delete
  25. Thank you. I'm sick and tired of bastardization. Actually (literally), what irks me most are the almost intelligent sounding phrases: "I could of, would of, should of" and people who "could care less." When will those bastards realize this means they care?

    xoRobyn

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  26. Oops, I should OF literally read through all the comments first. I see I supposably am in good company. What does a person in the South say when they're going to use a real axe?

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    1. Oh Robyn, I could of cared less if you'd read previous comments. We're just glad to have you (literally) stop by.

      Delete
  27. The literally thing really bothers me too. The really bad part though, is I live in the south. Home of the bastardized English language. My mom once dated someone who said "roa-stad-eer-icken" for "rotisserie chicken". They're not together anymore and that's not the worst of his word crimes.

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    1. Like a bad car wreck, half of me wants to know those other word crimes, and the other half thinks I'd be better off not knowing.

      Delete
  28. I aha'd at the Ask body spray. I think if they actually did that I might buy some.

    Literally always did me in. "I will run over my fictitious dog if you do that! LITERALLY!" is one sure fire way to make me wish internal bleeding upon you. If it were legal, I would literally fuck your shit u— wait..
    But what really gets to me is the dictionary is on their side! It's not like you can say "Oh, it's just Merriam Webster..

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Merriam-Webster: "Man, people keep fucking up this word. You know what? Let's just change the word's definition. We're the dictionary, after all... WE CAN DO THAT."

      *ominous laughter, lightning striking in the background*

      Delete
  29. Literally is on of my pet peeves!I also sometimes hear people use unpossible.

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  30. Whoa, this was a funny post, but the comments are hysterical. Especially when taken literally.

    After living in Idaho for way too long, I now know what degeettyt and yawontto mea. But my favorites come from Chicago; think...yous guys, take me with, and everyone owns a garach key. Technically speaking, irregardless makes me crazy...no it really did, I mean does. Literally.

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  31. "Ask Body Spray" might be a good name change.

    Some of the guys that use that stuff NEED to be reminded once in a while of the importance of consent.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. That's assuming the advertisements work and a woman actually wants to have sex with a man slathered in Axe.

      Delete
  32. Great stuff and Im wif you.

    Do you boys remember the Jib Jab spoof between John Kerry & Dubyah during the 2004 presidential race? It was sung to the music of This Land is Your Land". Kerry admonishes Bush for his inability to say "nuclear".

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    1. I never saw that, but I do still laugh at the word 'strategery.'

      Delete
  33. I recently attended my Doctor's surgery, who advised me that we were going to have a prostrate examination, requiring him to examine me internally in a pacific region. I'm still waiting for him to send me the airtickets. What should I pack?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pack your dignity, if you can still find it somewhere.

      Delete
  34. As a former English major, I admit that a couple of these (irregardless, I could care less) have literally escaped my lips (hey you hear it often enough...)....and that GW Bush gad me second-guessing myself on how to pronounce nuclear.

    I had a former employee who was very pacific about the fact that she liked bisketti.

    The wonders of four decades of the National Education Association and more to come as common core is implemented.

    "The world needs ditch diggers, too"
    -Ted Knight, from Caddyshack

    ReplyDelete
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    1. And as long as those ditch diggers don't contribute to our dictionary entries, a few mistakes here and there are exspecially understandable.

      Delete
  35. I'd have to say I was on the "wrong side" of this post. Not because I only grajeeated sixth grade, but because IMHO part of the charm of American English is to simply make up a new word (or severely maul an old one)when ever you need to- and 90% of people instantly understand it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The first step is admitting you have a problem.

      Really, though, made up words are the best. I can only hope to one day create a word that takes off and becomes a common, everyday word. Like, did you know that Dr. Seuss coined the word 'nerd'?

      Delete
  36. I,too, hate the "li-berry" mispronunciation. I have a problem with people that say " it's deja vu, all over again", as well. It nearly makes me ill enough that I need to go "lay" down in my be'room. Seems that you literally touched a few nerves on this one. Irregardless...I think it's funny.

    ReplyDelete
  37. irregardless is my number 1 pet peeve. It makes my hand itch to just slap the heck out of the offender.

    ReplyDelete
  38. That's English for you, and language in general.

    We studied this in Linguistics, and there is nothing we can do to stop this. Then again, people 50 years back would be horrified at how much we've "degraded" English.

    No one uses "whom" anymore, and at one point, it was considered inappropriate to use the word "lot" to refer to a plot of land.

    I intend on speaking English properly for my generation. Makes me look like an elitist.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like coming across as a hipster elitist just because I can properly use whom. And believe you me, I use whom like a motherfucker. I know, I know... whom would do such a thing?

      Delete
  39. My son says literally in front of every word. He thinks its an adjective. I began to hate that word many years ago....literally.

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  40. I was listening to a story from a nice but backwoods cleaning lady one day and during one point in the story she tried to say, "...and then it dawned on me" but she ended up saying, "and then it donged on me" and I came very close to peeing in my pants.

    I live in Virginia, so this is pretty typical. A woman named Sharanda Jones told me her whole life story yesterday at Walmart and there was a great deal of this. Apparently she wakes her kids up at 4 am to clean their rooms so that her mom won't call child protective services on her again. She has also moved to a third story apartment because she knows her mother cannot walk up all those steps. She is a clever minx, that Sharanda Jones.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If this woman does not yet have her own reality show... make it happen, man!

      Delete
  41. Misused words literally grind my gears.

    I think I might have to balance the "literally" problem out by over-using "figuratively."

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I figuratively love this idea. Like, figuratively.

      Delete
  42. Some slip ups I can see, they irk, but are understandable. But those above. I'd need ear plugs

    ReplyDelete
  43. THANK YOU. It's painful, it really is. Every time someone says to me 'I'm literally freezing', or sometimes it's even used as a filler, just 'literally...' when people don't know what to say! Another that really bugs me is when people say 'no, not pacifically'...

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I literally hate when people just aren't pacific enough. They need to be more atlantic.

      Delete
  44. The bit that made me crack up the most was when you were like "What's Up Yung Skreezy" this entire post really made me laugh so hard though. It's sadly true as well, I hate when people spell disgusting "discusting" too, especially when they seem to think they're intelligent using the word, great post guys, while sad like I say all the same.

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    Replies
    1. The word discusting is literally discusting. I am literally recoiling in discust.

      Delete
  45. I hate, hate, hate bad grammar and bad spelling. Prolly makes me want to strangle the person that wrote it. How stupid do you suppose humanity is going to get? It kind of scares me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unfortunately... prolly pretty damn stupid. Idiocracy called it.

      Delete
  46. I have a personal love of double negatives, and plenty of foreign languages use them (because they have an additive property, so it's a way of adding an emphasis), I think Latin was the one language that finally put the foot down and said negatives in language should be the same as they are in math... but then again, those Romans didn't use Arabic numerals either, so they couldn't have been that smart.

    Wow. Did I make a point there? I'm sure I had one when I started typing.

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    1. I think your comment was a double negative and therefore canceled itself out. And hey, don't you bring math into this! The whole reason I'm a writer is because I can't stand math! (Just ask Thinking Cap)

      Delete
  47. Well I really get irritated when people villanize those of us who try to warsh our cars in Febuary. I mean it makes me really nautious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's probably their fault too. Remember, it takes two to tangle.

      Delete
  48. It drives me crazy when people use "I" wrong. For example:

    "This is a picture of my friend and I dancing in the rain."

    It's "me" people! Not "I". "My friend and me!"

    I feel like I am stuck in an old Marilyn Monroe movie sometimes.

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    Replies
    1. Amen, sistah Sharon! This is a topic that's definitely sensitive to you and I!

      Delete
  49. It's weird. A while back I pointed out to Andrew Leon that nobody ever wrote a funny column about grammar, which is why I started putting "Grammar Funnies" as an occasional feature on my blog 'pop'.

    Then this week, Josh Fruhlinger has been going on and on about how double negatives are actually an accepted part of many languages. Then I come here and you guys are talking about grammar, too.

    But yours is the funniest.

    PS: I am from Wisconsin, where we have a city called "Fon du Lac," which is stupid -- the name, the city itself is of average intelligence -- but from my section of Wisconsin, people pronounce the 'd' as a "j," so we say: "Fonjalac." This is actually a thing. A stupid thing, but a thing.

    Also, my grandpa used to say "Ain'a," which was a contraction (?) of "ain't it," as an emphasis on a sentence:

    EG: "That's the exit for Fonjalac, ain'a?"

    When I used the word 'ain'a' in his eulogy, it got the biggest laugh ever. Which doesn't sound good, now that I wrote it out. But a guy's got to start his comedy career somewhere. (That's what Sinbad always said.)

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    1. You mean grammar can be funny? As McBain from the Simpsons would say, "This is not a comedy." I thought this was just a public service announcement. Please try not to laugh at such a serious topic. We're literally just trying to help people.

      Also, we both drink a great beer called La Fin Du Monde, or as your local friends might call it, Lafinjumond.

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  50. First off, where are you guys in reference to the floods. You both safe? You were commenting on Saturday, so hopefully that means all is well.

    Well, you mentioned the two big ones right off. I have a friend who uses "supposably" both verbally and in writing. She thinks that is the real word. I know someone who thinks "nuclear" is spelled "nucular." For real. And there's a girl I know who uses "coherse" instead of "coerced." She's been doing it for years in debates online and no one has pointed it out to her. It's one of her favorite words, and every time she says it at this point I want to beat her over the head with a dictionary. I don't understand. All they have to do is look these words up.

    ARGH!

    Shannon at The Warrior Muse

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  51. I hate the literally thing SO MUCH. I also hate my all my cousins say "cuttle-ry" instead of "cutlery" xx

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  52. I hate the literally thing SO MUCH. I also hate my all my cousins say "cuttle-ry" instead of "cutlery" xx

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  53. The sanctioning of literally reminds me of Louis CK's rant about using the word "hilarious" in his special... well... "Hilarious." Empty hyperbole (like "hilarious" and "amazing") drives me nuts.

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  54. This post has my undying love and respect. Irregardless, aks, supposably, literally, and like are my biggest irritants. I try not to be on the Word Policq squad too much but really? Some people just need to go back to GRAMMAR school.

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  55. I am an Aussie, we have all our own words that we can mangle

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  56. I am studying to be an English teacher to people who do not speak English, so I deal with language on an academic and scientific inquiry level daily. What I am learning in class is that language is an ever-evolving creature. It is not growing simpler or being bastardized, it is simply changing and will continue to do so, just as it always has.

    Outside of my education, (on a personal level) I cannot agree with you more. I LITERALLY want to rip someone's head off every time I hear the word supposebly or liberry.

    Other ones that drive me nuts:

    Writing "should of" instead of "should have." Should've is the contraction. If someone wants to spell it all out, it is "should have," morons.

    People who say Wal-Marts. There is no 's'

    I live in Illinois. The 's' is silent. I might forgive those from another state, but the locals should know this.

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